Tag: forgive

Jean Valjean, a vagabond in the classic “Les Miserables” was a just released prisoner in midlife. “Nineteen years in French prison have left him rough and fearless. He walked for four days in the Alpine chill of nineteenth century southeastern France, only to find that no inn will take him, no tavern will feed him.” Max Lucado tells the story in “Grace.” “Finally he knocks on the door of a bishop’s house. Monseigneur Myriel is seventy five years old. Like Valjean he has lost much. The revolution took all the valuables from his family, except some silverware, a soup ladle, and two candlesticks.” “Valjean expects the religious man to turn him away. “ “But the Bishop is kind. He asks the visitor to sit near a fire.” “He explains, ‘This is not my house, but the house of Jesus Christ.’””…  They dine on soup and bread, figs, and cheese with…

A part of our lives that requires humility comes when we must reconcile — with God, with our friend, our spouse, a neighbor. “I’m sorry”– that I took liberties in my self-righteousness. I’m sorry for hurtful words, for hurtful acts which broke your heart. Friends, the anti-Christ spirit of the age touts “big-boy” clothing, promotes the world of fighting rage, laughs at the “second-rate” people who dare to say, “I’m sorry.” These are labeled “weak” and despised. These weakened ones cannot play in “man” games of slander and character defamation without remorse — they surmise. These lack the courage to threaten others, to harass, to justify hatred, to blame — they decide. These cannot converse behind the backs of colleagues, separate friends, perfect the two-faced sagacity, conspire to maim — they figure. The “big adult people” view sincere love as an Achilles heal, a flaw to be exploited. They escalate…

Now when the Pharisee which had bidden him saw it, he spake within himself, saying, This man, if he were a prophet, would have known who and what manner of woman this is that toucheth him: for she is a sinner. Luke_7:39 What kind of prophet? An ethics policeman? Greg Boyd makes an insightful observation in His article on “The Point of the Book of Job.” “Most of us do not like ambiguity. Life is generally easier if we convince ourselves that everything is clear and simple. This, I believe, is part of our legacy of eating of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil (Gen 3:1-7). In our fallen delusion, we feel it our rightphet, and within our capacity, to declare unambiguously who and what is “good” and who and what is “evil.” We are not omniscient, but having eaten from the forbidden tree, we have a fallen misguided…