Tag: <span>love</span>

A story recalled from Bergen-Belsen — a prisoner “strikes up a friendship with a doctor named Marie. The two are talking one day when a Polish prisoner comes to Marie for help. She is not sick — she is about to give birth. At first Fania and Marie panic, but then they collect themselves and have the woman lie down on a table. Silence is imperative, so the woman, ‘teeth clenched,’ uttered not a word. She knew the fate of children at the hands of the SS. Fortunately, the child arrives quickly, There are no scissors, Marie cuts the cord with her teeth. There is no water, Fania rips the lining out of her coat, fashions a  crude version of swaddling clothes, and wraps up the baby, still covered with blood. The woman, who has not yet said a word” — dresses, puts on her shoes, and takes her child…

Belonging? to be suitable, appropriate, or advantageous, to be in a proper situation. to be the property of a person or thing  to be attached or bound by birth, allegiance, or dependency  to be a member of a club, organization, or set  The very human desire to belong has been recognized since the garden of Eden, as our first parents forfeited ‘belonging’ for personal advantage. Enacting their ‘unbelonging’ experiment by defying their Maker, Adam and Eve discovered fear and hiding, a covert strategy for life. As their guilt filled nature developed under this false cover — through their offspring — so all of its malignancy’s many squirms and weasels came out. All of us have paid severely, victims of other’s deviations — victims of our own frightful hearts. James 4:1-2 explain this further: “What causes wars and contentions among you? Is it not the cravings which are ever at war…

“The voice of my beloved! lo, this—he is coming, Leaping on the mountains, skipping on the hill’s.” Song of Solomon 2:8 When last had we leapt or jumped or even skipped? Buoyant as a bird or gazelle comes a jumping someone, in our allegorical sense it’s the Christ, resurrected from the dead and demonstrating what a post-grave world looks like. Lo and behold He invites you and me into it. “Behold, there He stands behind our wall, gazing through the windows, looking through the lattice.” Song of Solomon 2:9 From the glory of the resurrected world, our Messiah seeks us who have not yet passed through. My beloved speaks and says to me: “Arise, my love, my beautiful one, and come away,” Song of Solomon 2:10 We were, before salvation came, dead in trespasses and sins , But now, we hear of His love for us,  we wonder as He…

” Contrary to popular expectation, Christianity offers no simple solution to man’s problems or to the integration of his personality; it does promise the abiding presence of Christ…..There is no offer of ease, but the promise of grace for the experience.” Morris A. Inch from his book, “Psychology in the Psalms.” As an illustration of this premise I thought of the story of Jesus, walking on the water. Matthew 14 records this for us. “Immediately (Jesus)  made the disciples get into the boat and go before him to the other side, while he dismissed the crowds.”  “And after he had dismissed the crowds, he went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone, “ The disciple were sent on ahead. The crowd which Jesus had been teaching were dismissed. Jesus went alone to be with His Father. The excitement of being with Jesus…

When we get to our after-death resurrection, we will not have a sin nature. I see that quite easily. However, in my present before-death state, I see myself, “black but comely” as did the Shulamite woman in Song of Solomon 1:5-6. Baked by the scorching sun, dwelling among rival siblings, forced to oversee the family business, and all of it neglects personal development — her own vineyard. Song of Solomon is telling the story of a woman traveling from earth to heaven — but all of it transpires while still on earth. Her vehicle is not a horse, wagon or car. No, her road consists in the imagery of her mind, in which she paints a picture of the “New Creation” daily. The journey beholds the glory of the Lord, as in a glass, and then she is changed into that selfsame image. See 2 Corinthians 3:18. Much is expressed…

Psalm 22:6 “I am a worm.” “The Crimson worm [coccus ilicis] is a very special worm that looks more like a grub than a worm. When it is time for the female or mother Crimson worm to have babies (which she does only one time in her life), she finds the trunk of a tree, a wooden fencepost or a stick. She then attaches her body to that wood and makes a hard crimson shell.” “She is so strongly and permanently stuck to the wood, that the shell can never be removed without tearing her body completely apart and killing her.” “The Crimson worm then lays her eggs under her body and the protective shell. When the baby worms (or larvae) hatch, they stay under the shell. Not only does the mother’s body give protection for her babies, but it also provides them with food – the babies feed on…

The love of many will wax cold — iniquity will abound. Men’s hearts will fail them for fear. Chilling love, hearts expire. Interesting it is, how heart and love go together. A heart holds the issue of life for a person and possibly that “go” is goodness and kindness. A man believes and embraces these noble attributes and holds them firm in his value system. But can that value system sustain him in the time of testing? Is that value system changeable? In a book by Carl H. Stevens, “cosmic loneliness,” our Pastor quotes Rollo May: he defines Anxiety as “the reaction to the threat to values one identifies with his existence as a self, ” “a person can meet anxiety to the extent that his Values are stronger than the threat.” Again from May, “man defines maturity as the holding of values, with no importance placed on the truth…

Any man, redeemed or other, can recognize the following possibilities: Knowing that I am different — I can isolate myself from others. Recognizing that others are different — I am suspicious of others, I can deceive others. I can meet my own needs, Free will — I can resist the devil, but, I can resist God. I can choose what will influence me — spirit or sense. Oswald Chambers expounds in his book, “Biblical Psychology,”  these soul powers. Expansion, contraction, and rotation are three. From these headings we have seven subtitles, “self-comprehending, (discerning where I leave off and the other person begins). stretching beyond self, (imagination). self-living (will),” spirit penetrated, (a soul has this capability). stirred sensually (soulishly) or spiritually, speaking spirit thoughts, sum total of unity.” Fundamental abilities, these, of course, require further explanation; they function one way in the unredeemed person, as above describes, but differently in the redeemed.…

J.B. operated as a spy of the K.G.B. in America during the cold war. A brilliant intellect, J.B. was especially chosen, trained and then sent. In America his skill developed in his ability to merge unsuspected into society; he worked, attended university, married and parented a child. At a time when J.B. would be recalled to his homeland, he discovered a problem: he had fallen head over heals for his newborn daughter. The love for her grew so great during her early years that he refused to go back; he made up a brilliant excuse, and stayed. This man, whose testimony is heard in churches, was later introduced to Jesus Christ, whom he received gladly. Love did it. Can we underestimate the dynamite called love? Bursting forth on the stoic intellects of men and women, love, in all of its purity, excitement, joy and exchange, overpowers the heart and soul,…

Love, with heat and moisture, irons out a wrinkle, mends a broken heart. It even unifies a division, straightens a crooked or double mind. An animal may respond to love, so might a tree; these have some form of life in them. But, a man or woman cannot survive without love! The sophisticated psyche of a man checks his barbaric side. He remains cool. He would like to run amok all over the planet, but stifles his urges. Then he is told of “liberation” and feels cheated and hypocritical. He begins to explore his dark barbarism, but has no understanding of its depth. He senses that the cost for “liberation” will be rejection from the sophisticates, but the feeling of “free” empowers him forward. He affirms his rights of individuality; becomes more and more barbaric. He wonders where love has gone, but he has forsaken its initiation; he has chosen…